College Students’ Right to Vote

College Students and Voting Rights

Amendment XXVI

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are 18 years of age or older, to vote, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of age.

Section 2.The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

 

The 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution changed the voting age from 21 to 18, making it possible for a higher percentage of college students to vote.

The U.S. Supreme Court cases Dunn v. Blumstein found that durational residence requirements for voters were unconstitutional, thus ensuring the right of college students to vote either in their hometowns or their college cities or towns.

The Brennan Center for Justice Student Voting Guide addresses concerns students may have about how voter registration may impact residency, financial aid, tuition, taxes and car registration in each state.

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Works Cited

26th Amendment. U.S. Constitution. Cornell University Law School.  Legal Information Institute.  LII. http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/amendmentxxvi

Dunn v. Blumstein – 405 U.S. 330 (1972) Volume 405. US Supreme Court.  US Case Law.  US Law.  Justia.  Justia US Supreme Court. http://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/405/330/case.html

Student Voting Guide | FAQ.  Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law.  August 31, 2010.  http://www.brennancenter.org/analysis/student-voting-guide-faq#tuition

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“No education s…

“No education system is better than its teachers. Teachers are the custodians of learning.”
~ Ban Ki Moon, UN Secretary General

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Posted in Educators, Faculty

Myths and Misinformation

Clearing Up Common Misconceptions About Higher Education

Myth #1:  College graduates have such a difficult time finding jobs, college is not worth the investment.

Data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics data show an unemployment rate of more than 9 percent for high school graduates, but only a 5% unemployment rate for college graduates as of 2012.  The data also show a lower unemployment rate for workers for each level of education attained.

Additionally these data show that median weekly earnings increase for workers for each level of education attained.

Myth #2:  Dropping Out is Temporary

Sixty-two percent of students who drop out of college do not return according to With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them, A Public Agenda Report for The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Myth #3:  Average time to earn a bachelor’s degree is four years

U.S. Department of Education data for 2013 show that 59% of full-time undergraduate students at 4-year degree granting institutions who started in 2005 took 150% of the time to graduate, that is, they took six years to complete their degrees.

U.S. Department of Education data for 2013 show that 31% of full-time undergraduate students at 2-year degree granting institutions who started in 2008 took 150% of the time to graduate, that is, they took three years to complete their degrees or certificates.

Myth #4:  Dropping out of college is the best catalyst to becoming a successful entrepreneur

A Kauffman survey found that 82 percent of U.S.-born technology or engineering company founders had earned a bachelor’s degree.

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Works Cited                                                                                                                         

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them, A Public Agenda Report. in Why Do Students Drop Out or Opt Out.” Community College Completion Corps.  Phi Theta Kappa.  2014.  http://www.cccompletioncorps.org/ccccorps/ptk/why-students-drop-out

Earnings and Unemployment Projections by educational attainment. (2012) Employment Projections.  United States Department of Labor.  Bureau of Labor Statistics. http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_chart_001.htm

Institute of Education Sciences.  Fast Facts. Graduation Rates.  The National Center for Education Statistics http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=40

Wadhwa, V. and Freeman, R. B. and Rissing, B. A., Education and Tech Entrepreneurship (May 1, 2008). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1127248 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1127248

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Posted in Graduates, Institutions of Higher Education, Money, Students

Higher Education and People with Disabilities

A Look at the Numbers

U.S. Census data indicate that 19% of the population was living with a disability in 2010.

In 2007-2008 11.8% of college students were living with a disability.

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Works Cited

The National Center for Education Statistics.  Fast Facts: Students with disabilities.https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=60

U.S. Department of Commerce.  United States Census Bureau.  Newsroom.  Americans with Disabilities: 2010 in Nearly 1 in 5 People Have a Disability in the U.S., Census Bureau Reports:  Report Released to Coincide with 22ned Anniversary of the ADA. https://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/miscellaneous/cb12-134.html

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A Closer Look

Examining the G.E.D. as a Stepping Stone to a College Degree

The GED Testing Service administered the GED in its most recent form until 2014.  The test has gone through another set of changes and is now administered by Pearson VUE and the American Council on Education (ACE).

The GED Testing Service reported that 95 percent of colleges accept the GED in the same way they accept a high school diploma.

U.S. Census data indicate that in of the 16.9 adult G.E.D. earners in 2009, only 43% went on to complete some postsecondary coursework, with only five percent earning a bachelor’s degree or a higher degree.  By comparison, 73% of high school graduates from that year went on to complete some postsecondary coursework with 33% earning a bachelor’s degree or a higher degree.

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Works Cited

Ewert, S. U.S. Department of Commerce.  United States Census Bureau.  Random Samplings: The official blog of the U.S, Census Bureau.  GED Recipients Have Lower Earnings, are Less Likely to Enter College. http://blogs.census.gov/2012/02/27/ged-recipients-have-lower-earnings-are-less-likely-to-enter-college/

G.E.D. Testing Service®.  2002 Series GED® Test FAQ’s . http://www.gedtestingservice.com/testers/faqs-test-taker

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Education Prevents Child Marriage

Education Reduces Chances of Girls Becoming Child Brides

CARE reports that 64 million girls around the world have been made to marry before the age of 18.  CARE points out that almost 39,000 girls a day are forced into marriage before the age of 18.  1 in 9 girls becomes a child bride before she turns 15.  Some of the girls are as young as 7.

But CARE reports that girls who complete secondary school are less likely to become child brides—6 times less likely to be forced into becoming child brides.  #StealTheseStats

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Works Cited

CARE.  Our Work.  Women’s Empowerment. Child Marriage.  http://www.care.org/work/womens-empowerment/child-marriage

CARE.  Our Work.  Women’s Empowerment. Child Marriage. Steal These Stats. Share These Facts About Child Marriage. http://www.care.org/work/womens-empowerment/child-marriage

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A New Lexicon

Language Changes about Education Reflect New Approaches to Education

Junior College –> Community College Two-year colleges were initially called junior colleges. They offered coursework designed to allow students to continue their education by transferring to four-year colleges. As the educational focus widened to meet the needs of the larger community by including remedial education, adult education, vocational/technical education and continuing education coursework a large number of these institutions became known as community colleges.

Co-ed –> Student Oberlin College became the first co-educational institution of higher learning in the world in 1833. The Oxford English Dictionary defines a co-ed as, ‘A girl or woman student at a co-educational institution’ citing examples of usage from as early as 1893. As more colleges admitted women as students, women students became known simply as students.

Correspondence Courses –> Distance Learning Early on correspondence courses were conducted through papers and materials being sent back and forth through the mail. Current data on correspondence courses was difficult to find as they have evolved largely into distance learning programs. Distance learning courses and programs include live as well as pre-recorded coursework, interactive conferencing and websites and CD-ROMs and DVDs.   As of 2007, 20.4% percent of postsecondary students were taking some education courses online; whereas 3.7% of postsecondary students were taking their entire program online. The percentage of students taking distance learning coursework is slightly higher for students working full time, and married students, students with dependents and for students with mobility issues.

+ MOOC In 2013 the American Council on Education recommended five Mass Open On-line Courses or MOOCs’ for credit. The colleges themselves determine whether to accept the recommendations of offering college credit for students completing the courses. The approved courses were offered by three colleges: two from Duke University, two from the University of California at Irvine and one at the University of Pennsylvania. MOOC’s offer institutions a way to reach large numbers of students as evidenced by the 10000 students who enrolled in a free eight-week course on bioelectricity offered by Duke University in 2012. Of the students who enrolled, 321 completed the course, earning a certification. As Catropa notes in “Big (MOOC) Data” and as this study demonstrates, MOOCs also allow institutions to collect and analyze data about everything from how many countries students represented to how many questions students attempted on the first quiz, from prior qualifications of students who completed all requirements to reasons students gave for not completing the course.

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Works Cited

Biolectricity: A Quantitative Approach.   Duke University’s First MOOC.  February 5, 2013.  http://dukespace.lib.duke.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/10161/6216/Duke_Bioelectricity_MOOC_Fall2012.pdf

Catropa, D. , in StratEDgy.  Blog U. Inside Higher Ed.  http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/stratedgy/big-mooc-data

“Co-ed.” OED.  Oxford English Dictionary.  The definitive record of the English language.  http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/35638?rskey=fno9BA&result=2#eid

Junior College Movement.  H. Stanton Tuttle, “JUNIOR-COLLEGE MOVEMENT,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kdj02),

Kolowich, S. American Council on Education Recommends 5 MOOCs for Credit.  Technology.  News.  The Chronicle of Higher Education.  February 7, 2013.   https://chronicle.com/article/American-Council-on-Education/137155/

National Center for Education Statistics.  Fast Facts. Distance Learning. http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=80

National Women’s History Museum.  Presents: The History of Women in Education. Timeline. http://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/education/Timeline.htm

Walton Radford, A. and Weko, T.  U.S. Department of Education.  Stats in Brief.  October 2011.  “Learning at a Distance: Undergraduate Enrollment in Distance Education Courses and Degree Programs.” http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2012/2012154.pdf

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